Wednesday & Thursday

Sketchbook Activity

Op Art

Op painting used a framework of purely geometric forms as the basis for its effects and also drew on colour theory and the physiology and psychology of perception. Leading figures were Bridget RileyJesus Rafael Soto, and Victor Vasarely. Vasarely was one of the originators of op art. Soto’s work often involves mobile elements and points up the close connection between kinetic and op art.

Lecture & Vocabulary

S7 - DAY FOUR - Typography

Sans serif:

Serifs are small lines at the ends of character strokes. Sans serif, or without serif, refers to typefaces without these lines. Sans serif fonts are often used when a large typeface is necessary, such as in a magazine headline. Helvetica is a popular sans serif typeface. Sans serif fonts are also common for website text, as they can be easier to read on screen. Arial is a sans serif typeface that was designed specifically for on-screen use.

 

Serif:

Serif fonts are recognizable by the small lines at the ends of the various strokes of a character. As these lines make a typeface easier to read by guiding the eye from letter to letter and word to word, serif fonts are often used for large blocks of text, such as in a book. Times New Roman is an example of a common serif font.

Blackletter

These heavy, black typefaces (whose capital letters are often ornate) were the very first metal type known in Europe. The earliest of these in Europe were from the Gutenberg workshop and were copies of letters found in handwritten manuscripts. Also known as "Old English.

Roman

In Macintosh font menus, this is called Plain meaning text that has no style applied to it (i.e., Italic, Bold, Boldltalic). Roman fonts are upright thick-and-thin weighted, and usually serifed type. The classical Roman letter style began in A.D. 114 with letters chiseled in the stone of the Trajan Columns in Rome.

Gothic

In modern usage, Gothic refers to sans serif monoweight letters (for example, Letter Gothic). These have little contrast of thick and thin lines, and no ornamentation, yet still retain the intensive boldness of the traditional Gothic. After the invention of typography in Europe by Gutenberg in AD 1450, the traditional Gothic style of lettering fell into the shadow of Venetian Old Style typography. 

Modern

A modified version of Old Style. these high contrast letters have heavy, untapered stems and light serifs. Originally developed by Firmin Didot and Giambattista Bodoni during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Geometric

Serif or sans serif designs composed of visually geometric character shapes. Some good examples are Lubalin Graph, Avant Garde, and Futura

Old Style

Characterized by variations in stroke width, bracketed serifs, high contrast, and a diagonal stroke. Some popular Old Styles include Bembo, Garamond, Janson, and Caslon. Originally developed during the Renaissance and adopted by Venetian printers in the 15th century, these were based on pen drawn forms.

Sign-Out Activity

Video Art - Solus

USING TRANSMITTERS

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

Classroom Zoom Hours - 1PM to 1:30 PM - Monday - Thursday

https://zoom.us/j/96694415843?pwd=UTFlVWxaUmI1QmlyTzZzQjl4K1B1UT09

Meeting ID: 966 9441 5843 - Passcode: Viscom

 

Office Zoom Hours - 2PM to 2:30 PM - Monday - Thursday

https://zoom.us/j/97743088893?pwd=LzlQcnZZYTFRd3ZGSHliV1gzUkdCUT09

Meeting ID: 977 4308 8893 - Passcode: Viscom

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

Students must be prepared to make a major commitment. It is our assumption that students entering the program are here to lay a foundation for a career in a design field and will be required to meet rigorous and stringent standards. Strong communication skills, both verbal and written, are required as is the ability to read and analyze. Serious students will find that the program will provide them with an excellent opportunity to develop the skills necessary to succeed in the job market or advance in education. _Most of the students graduating from the program _continue their education.
 

CONTACT US:

Steve Bross

Commercial Art Instructor

sbross@cmths.org

610-277-2301x332

Central Montco Technical High School

821 Plymouth Road

Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462

www.cmths.org

610-277-2301

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