CONTACT US:

Students must be prepared to make a major commitment. It is our assumption that students entering the program are here to lay a foundation for a career in a design field and will be required to meet rigorous and stringent standards. Strong communication skills, both verbal and written, are required as is the ability to read and analyze. Serious students will find that the program will provide them with an excellent opportunity to develop the skills necessary to succeed in the job market or advance in education. _Most of the students graduating from the program _continue their education.
 

Steve Bross

Commercial Art Instructor

sbross@cmths.org

610-277-2301x332

Central Montco Technical High School

821 Plymouth Road

Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462

www.cmths.org

610-277-2301

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

Web Site Built By The CTE Objective

RUBRIC - SKETCHBOOK: 50 PTS

Technique Research and Development, trials and errors:

1 to 15 Points - The sketchbook documents that the student has looked for solutions to develop their techniques. Trial and error is evidence of this development.

 

0 Points - Incomplete

___________

Documentation of influences and inspirations:

8 to 15 Points - A large variety (10 or more) of Pictures, prints, collages, writings, and other items are included in the sketchbook to show a variety of influences and inspirations.

1 to 7 Points - A variety (7-9) of Pictures, prints, collages, writings, and other items are included in the sketchbook to show a variety of influences and inspirations.

 

0 Points - Incomplete

___________

Follow through on individual assignments/time/effort:

11 to 15 Points - The students' sketchbook clearly shows that the student has been deeply exploring and troubleshooting new ideas that relate to the weekly interactions with the instructor.

6 to 10 Points - The students' sketchbook shows that the student has been exploring and troubleshooting new ideas that relate to the weekly interactions with the instructor.

 

1 to 5 Points - The students' sketchbook shows some evidence that the student has been trying new ideas that relate to the weekly interactions with the instructor.

0 Points - The students' sketchbook shows minimal exploration of new ideas that relate to the weekly interactions with the instructor.

 

Why do you need to Sketch

Sketching gives people the freedom to consider every wild idea without the fear of making a mistake. This is a creative, generative process that can not only discover great ideas but create better teamwork. With lots of ideas on the table teams down into fuller, more amazing decisions in our products.

 

To illustrate this point, Buxton tells a story about a pottery teacher who splits their classroom in half. The first half was told their final grade would be based on one perfect pottery example. The other half would be graded based on the cumulative physical weight of their work. You would think the first group that had all semester to plan and masters their technique with one perfect piece would create the best work, but it wasn't so. The second group that repeated the process over and over, without focusing on perfection, ended up creating not only the most work but the best work. This is the reason why sketching is such an important part of the design process.

 

What Makes a Sketch, a Sketch?

Buxton talks about eleven attributes that make sketching valuable and important. Sketches are:

- Quick - We don't need to spend a lot of time mulling over our ideas.

- Timely - Its super easy to whip up a sketch in the middle of a meeting to help describe an idea.

- Inexpensive - All you need is something to write on and a pen.

- Disposable - If the idea doesn't last, it doesn't hurt to recycle some paper.

- Plentiful - It only takes a couple hours to jam through 40 or more sketches.

- Have a clear vocabulary - When someone sees a sketch, they intuitively know its just an idea or a "what if'."

- A distinct gesture - Sketches are loose and invite conversation and collaboration.

- Have minimal detail - Don't sweat the details, just get your idea on paper to spark something with your team.

- Have the appropriate level of refinement - The rough feeling of a sketch helps keep the conversations broad.

- They suggest and explore rather than confirm - We can ask questions and start a conversation about the problems at hand. We decide on details later.

- They are ambiguous - Sketches leave ideas open to misinterpretation and give people the chance to read into them further. This often leads to even better ideas and make people feel invested.