CONTACT US:

Students must be prepared to make a major commitment. It is our assumption that students entering the program are here to lay a foundation for a career in a design field and will be required to meet rigorous and stringent standards. Strong communication skills, both verbal and written, are required as is the ability to read and analyze. Serious students will find that the program will provide them with an excellent opportunity to develop the skills necessary to succeed in the job market or advance in education. _Most of the students graduating from the program _continue their education.
 

Steve Bross

Commercial Art Instructor

sbross@cmths.org

610-277-2301x332

Central Montco Technical High School

821 Plymouth Road

Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462

www.cmths.org

610-277-2301

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

Web Site Built By The CTE Objective

Basic Photography
Photo/Video - 1/1

Basic Photography - Studio Portrait

OVERVIEW:

Student Objectives: Basic Photography/Camera controls and Composition- Provided with a lecture, examples, study guide, guided practice, and student resources, the students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use the basic camera functions and conducting their first product photo shoot.

 

In order to take photos that are both pleasing to the eye and technically correct, you need to know the fundamentals of camera operations. For this first assignment, you will be introduced to the use of an “SLR” or Single Reflex Camera. You will learn the basic controls such as:

  • Powering On and Off

  • Inserting and formatting the memory card

  • Navigating camera menus

  • Using lenses to zoom and focus images

  • Composition and framing

 

You will also be exposed to and become familiar with working in a studio environment. This includes:

  • Use of studio equipment including tripods, lighting, shooting tables

  • Backdrops and backgrounds

  • Composing and laying out objects to photograph images

 

At the conclusion of this assignment, you will be able to

  • Start up your camera

  • Set up and compose your image

  • Remove your images from your camera card

  • Print a contact sheet

  • Print your final image

  • Save your files

 

Lecture – Introduction to SLR Cameras and Studio Equipment (20-30 minutes)

During this lecture, you will learn about the basic layout and setup of a typical professional photography studio and the equipment used to conduct a photo shoot. You will also be split into small groups and the instructor will give you a tour of the studio and hands-on instruction working with the equipment. You will also learn about the safety procedures necessary to work in a photo studio. You will be given a checklist to complete by the conclusion of this assignment.

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

Lighting has three main purposes:

  1. Create an illusion of depth (modeling).

  2. Create a mood.

  3. Normalize (or, conversely, emphasize) the subject's features.

 

A studio lighting system usually includes at least two light sources, the main and the fill light. Other light sources such as background lights and accent lights can be added, as well. The Main Light is the dominant light source in a portrait lighting setup. Therefore, portrait lighting styles are defined by the relationship of the Main Light to the mask, or front, of the subject's face. Two factors determine the style of lighting. The first factor is the side of the face that the Main Light is directed toward.

 

Distance to Subject and Relative Size of Light Source

Hard Light Soft Light

 

The apparent size of a light source depends on its relative size to the subject and its distance from the subject. The relative size of a light source has a dramatic effect on the shape and brightness of the highlight as well as the softness of shadows cast by the light.

 

A light source that is relatively large compared to a subject (a large softbox 3 feet from an apple, for example) will result in soft shadows, low contrast and a less sharp highlight. A smaller light source (small bulb 3 feet from the same apple) will result in greater contrast, increased brightness in the highlight and sharper shadows. Typically, portrait photographers desire a large relative light source for its soft qualities.

 

Distance from the subject can also cause the same light source to appear soft or harsh. A large softbox is relatively larger than an apple at 3 feet, but moving the softbox back to 15 feet makes it much smaller relative to the apple thus producing the same hard light that would come from a small source that was close to the apple. This is the reason for the various sizes of light modifiers that are available.

 

Experiment with your light source to see the effects of relative size and distance to subject. Soon you will be able to predict the results of your lighting setup when you make changes. A smooth object like a ball will most easily show the light quality in your photo.

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65aab7761ac2a56b317c99fb67ae9a8b--photography-studio-lighting-creative-portrait-photography
Assessment:

Students must be prepared to make a major commitment. It is our assumption that students entering the program are here to lay a foundation for a career in a design field and will be required to meet rigorous and stringent standards. Strong communication skills, both verbal and written, are required as is the ability to read and analyze. Serious students will find that the program will provide them with an excellent opportunity to develop the skills necessary to succeed in the job market or advance in education.

 

See Detailed Rubric Information
 

A Central Montco Technical High School Program!

HOMEWORK:

Year One, Project Overview:

- Bottles and Cans - Using Value
Draw bottles and cans.  Have them crunched up for details in the  reflections and folds of the  metal.  Include lots of detail and only  show a small area instead of  the whole can or cans.  If it is  a bottle,  find  an area  that  shows off  the  reflections and   surface quality of  the bottle.

 

1/9
Assessment:

Students must be prepared to make a major commitment. It is our assumption that students entering the program are here to lay a foundation for a career in a design field and will be required to meet rigorous and stringent standards. Strong communication skills, both verbal and written, are required as is the ability to read and analyze. Serious students will find that the program will provide them with an excellent opportunity to develop the skills necessary to succeed in the job market or advance in education.

 

See Detailed Rubric Information
 

Experimental Project:
Project Name: Ancient Mask

Project Overview: 

Ancient Use of Masks

Masks are objects that cover the face for a variety of reasons. They are used for protection, disguise, entertainment or ritual practices and are made from various materials, depending on use. The earliest use of masks was for rituals and ceremonies, and the oldest found mask is from 7000 BC. Art of making masks could be older but because of the materials used for making them (leather and wood), they did not survive to this day.

 

Oldest masks were of ritual purpose and could be found in many places of the world. They are generally similar in their overall appearance, but very different in style and way they are made and used.

 

Specifications: Using the supplied materials create a mask that supports an ancient design for a culture you made up.

 

EXAMPLES