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Students must be prepared to make a major commitment. It is our assumption that students entering the program are here to lay a foundation for a career in a design field and will be required to meet rigorous and stringent standards. Strong communication skills, both verbal and written, are required as is the ability to read and analyze. Serious students will find that the program will provide them with an excellent opportunity to develop the skills necessary to succeed in the job market or advance in education. _Most of the students graduating from the program _continue their education.
 

Steve Bross

Commercial Art Instructor

sbross@cmths.org

610-277-2301x332

Central Montco Technical High School

821 Plymouth Road

Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462

www.cmths.org

610-277-2301

Web Site Built By The CTE Objective

Fashion Design Career Focus - Level One

 

Student Goals:
Students will use all of the skills they have developed to begin producing a strong career focus fashion design portfolio

Purpose:
Build a career-focused portfolio.

Student Objectives:

Provided with multiple lectures, examples, study guides, guided practices, and student resources, the students will be able to build a career focused portfolio by producing 4 completed fashion design projects that demonstrate the industry standard of concept to a final design.

 

Tasks:

601 - Research the history of advertising design.

602 - Apply elements and principles of design.

603 - Interpret a creative or design brief.

 

Career Path: Advertising Design, Fine Artist, Illustration, Game Design & Photography/Video

901- Prepare and present a portfolio.

902 - Prepare and present a visual concept presentation.

903 - Estimate time and/or materials for a project.

905 - Matte and mount works of art.

906 - Participate in critiques of commercial art projects.

907 - Explore current industry trends.

509 - Utilize use of input, output and storage devices.

510 - Utilize different file formats correctly.

511 - Organize and manage digital files.

 

 

Fashion Design - Level One

Section 1: Sportswear

Sportswear is an American fashion term originally used to describe separates, but which, since the 1930s, has come to be applied to day and evening fashions of varying degrees of formality that demonstrate a specific relaxed approach to their design, while remaining appropriate for a wide range of social occasions.

 

The term is not necessarily synonymous with activewear, clothing designed specifically for participants in sporting pursuits. Although sports clothing was available from European haute couture houses and "sporty" garments were increasingly worn as everyday or informal wear, the early American sportswear designers were associated with ready-to-wear manufacturers. While most fashions in America in the early 20th century were directly copied from, or influenced heavily by Paris, American sportswear became a home-grown exception to this rule.

Section 2: Male & Female Formal Wear

For evening wear, the corresponding code is black tie (sometimes called tuxedo in American English). The name "black tie" for this type of evening wear can be misleading because it is a generally accepted practice to substitute other colors for the traditional black tie. In formal evening dress, or white tie dress, this practice of substituting colors in ties is much less common since men's fashion tends to follow tradition more deeply as it becomes more formal.

The origins of evening semi-formal attire date back to the later 19th century when Edward, Prince of Wales (subsequently Edward VII), wanted a more comfortable dinner attire than the swallowtail coat.

 

In the spring of 1886, the Prince invited James Potter, a rich New Yorker, and his wife Cora to Sandringham House, the Prince's hunting estate in Norfolk. When Potter asked for the Prince's dinner dress code, the Prince sent him to his tailor, Henry Poole & Co., in London, where he was given a suit made to the Prince's specifications with the dinner jacket.

On returning to Tuxedo Park, New York, in 1886, Potter's dinner suit proved popular at the Tuxedo Park Club. Not long afterward, when a group of men from the club chose to wear such suits to a dinner at Delmonico's Restaurant in New York City, other diners were surprised. They were told that such clothing was popular at Tuxedo Park, so the particular cut then became known as the "tuxedo".

From its creation into the 1920s, this dinner jacket was considered appropriate dress for dining in one's home or club, while the tailcoat remained in place as appropriate for public appearance.

Section 3: Snowboarding & Ski Styles

Topic:

Snowboarding is a winter sport that involves descending a slope that is covered with snow while standing on a board attached to a rider’s feet, using a special boot set onto a mounted binding. The development of snowboarding was inspired by skateboarding, sledding, surfing and skiing. It was developed in the United States in the 1960s to 1970s and became a Winter Olympic Sport in 1998.

Snowboarding has been around since the 1920s, when boys and men would tie plywood or wooden planks from barrels to their feet using clotheslines and horse reins in order to steer themselves down hills. Modern snowboarding began in 1965 when Sherman Poppen, an engineer in Muskegon, Michigan, invented a toy for his daughter by fastening two skis together and attaching a rope to one end so she would have some control as she stood on the board and glided downhill.

A Central Montco Technical High School Program!
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