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Students must be prepared to make a major commitment. It is our assumption that students entering the program are here to lay a foundation for a career in a design field and will be required to meet rigorous and stringent standards. Strong communication skills, both verbal and written, are required as is the ability to read and analyze. Serious students will find that the program will provide them with an excellent opportunity to develop the skills necessary to succeed in the job market or advance in education. _Most of the students graduating from the program _continue their education.
 

Steve Bross

Commercial Art Instructor

sbross@cmths.org

610-277-2301x332

Central Montco Technical High School

821 Plymouth Road

Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462

www.cmths.org

610-277-2301

Web Site Built By The CTE Objective

Fashion Design Career Focus - Level Two

 

Student Goals:
Students will use all of the skills they have developed to begin producing a strong career focus fashion design portfolio

Purpose:
Build a career-focused portfolio.

Student Objectives:

Provided with multiple lectures, examples, study guides, guided practices, and student resources, the students will be able to build a career focused portfolio by producing 4 completed fashion design projects that demonstrate the industry standard of concept to a final design.

 

Tasks:

601 - Research the history of advertising design.

602 - Apply elements and principles of design.

603 - Interpret a creative or design brief.

 

Career Path: Advertising Design, Fine Artist, Illustration, Game Design & Photography/Video

901- Prepare and present a portfolio.

902 - Prepare and present a visual concept presentation.

903 - Estimate time and/or materials for a project.

905 - Matte and mount works of art.

906 - Participate in critiques of commercial art projects.

907 - Explore current industry trends.

509 - Utilize use of input, output and storage devices.

510 - Utilize different file formats correctly.

511 - Organize and manage digital files.

 

 

Fashion Design - Level Two

Section 1: Casual

In the European tradition, casual is the dress code that emphasizes comfort and personal expression over presentation, formality and conformity. More simply, "casual" can be defined as something relaxed, occasional, not planned, or informal.It includes a very wide variety of costume, so it is perhaps better defined by what it is not than what it is. 

 

Informal business professional wear such as suits and ties. Although it can be considered "informal" in the senses of "not formal" or "suited for everyday use," informal attire actually refers to a dress code much more formal than casual wear, a step below Semi-formal wear. Casual wear should be done tastefully. No holes, tears, or stains.

Jeans and a T-shirt have been described as the "casual uniform". With the popularity of spectator sports in the late 20th century, a good deal of athletic gear has influenced casual wear. Clothing worn for manual labor also falls into casual wear.

Basic materials used for casual wear include denim, cotton, jersey, polyester, flannel, and fleece. Materials such as velvet, chiffon, and brocade could be considered too fancy for casual wear

Section 2: Costume Design

Costume design is the envisioning of clothing and the overall appearance of a character or performer. Costume may refer to the style of dress particular to a nation, a class, or a period. In many cases, it may contribute to the fullness of the artistic, visual world which is unique to a particular theatrical or cinematic production. The most basic designs are produced to denote status, provide protection or modesty, or provide visual interest to a character. Costumes may be for a theatercinema, or musical performance but may not be limited to such. Costume design should not be confused with costume coordination which merely involves altering existing clothing, although both create stage clothes.

Section 3: ?

Topic:

Snowboarding is a winter sport that involves descending a slope that is covered with snow while standing on a board attached to a rider’s feet, using a special boot set onto a mounted binding. The development of snowboarding was inspired by skateboarding, sledding, surfing and skiing. It was developed in the United States in the 1960s to 1970s and became a Winter Olympic Sport in 1998.

Snowboarding has been around since the 1920s, when boys and men would tie plywood or wooden planks from barrels to their feet using clotheslines and horse reins in order to steer themselves down hills. Modern snowboarding began in 1965 when Sherman Poppen, an engineer in Muskegon, Michigan, invented a toy for his daughter by fastening two skis together and attaching a rope to one end so she would have some control as she stood on the board and glided downhill.

A Central Montco Technical High School Program!
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